DIY Handheld Foam Cutter

Discussion in 'Walkera Talk' started by chase, May 15, 2016.

  1. chase
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    chase Member

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    I'm toying with the idea of adding pontoons to my Scout X4.

    I made this handheld foam cutter out of a couple 4" paint rollers this weekend and I thought you guys might like to see it as it turned out pretty decent.

    [​IMG]

    I still have to add the adjustable thumb spreader bar but it works great. Real good feel holding it. And it's built to last.

    The built in hangers on the handle add in the feature to hang it up out of the way when working with it or put away when not in use.

    The power supply, 120v in/12v out, I built last year...it's small but the 12 volt variable output goes up to 5 amps. Which should be plenty for what I want to do.

    This was the first chance I've had to start build the cutting tools to hook up to it. The 6"inch handheld cutter shown being the first build.

    I'm building a couple more cutters of varying sizes and may add an on/off switch to the handle. After trying this one out, I just think that would be a nice plus to have at hand.

    I'll be doing a "how to" of sorts for those interested on how to make this cutter,( the link is in the below post)

    Keep those props turning,
    - chase -
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2016
  2. chase
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    chase Member

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    Here's the completed handheld foam cutter with the spreader bar added for those interested.

    [​IMG]

    It may not need a spreader but it has one now just in case.
    I was hoping to find a longer nylon spacer so it could clip on the main uprights but I couldn't find one locally. So...
    Since they're hollow tubes, I came up with an internal braking system if you will to hold it in place.
    The nylon is very slippery and allows it to move easily and the brake keeps it in place.
    It worked out better than I thought it would and no fear of it sliding off.

    Total material cost around $7-$8 US and a couple hours work.
    Considering the least expensive one similar to this locally costs around $35... and that's for a hobby grade one.
    If you like building things... this might be a fun little project for you.

    More importantly = it's what you can do with it once you have one.
    Like making custom quad case interior or in my case... a set of pontoons for my quad(s).
    And... my 450 Heli.

    Or one of these...



    Which is on my build list...

    And here is the link as promised for the build on the handheld hot wire tool as well I opened up my power supply so you can see inside it - possibly build your own.

    Hot Wire Tools

    cheers,
    - chase -
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2016
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